The Healthiest Foods You Can Get

The following is a list of The Healthiest Foods You Can Get. This will help you get an idea as to what foods are the best for your body.

 Fruits

The Healthiest Foods You Can Get Apricots
Apricots contain Beta-carotene which helps to prevent radical damage and also helps to protect the eyes. A single apricot contains 17 calories, 0 fat, and one gram of fiber. You can eat them dried or soft.

The Healthiest Foods You Can Get Mango
A medium sized mango packs 57 MG of vitamin C, which is nearly your entire daily dose. This antioxidant will help prevent arthritis and also boost your immune system.

The Healthiest Foods You Can Get Cantaloupe
Cantaloupes contain 117 GG of vitamin C, which is almost twice the recommended dose. Half a melon contains 853 MG of potassium, which is nearly twice as much as a banana, which helps to lower blood pressure. Half a melon contains 97 calories, 1 gram of fat, and 2 grams of fiber.

The Healthiest Foods You Can Get Tomato
A tomato can help cut the risk of bladder, stomach, and colon cancers in half if you eat one daily. A tomaton contains 26 calories, 0 fat, and only 1 gram of fiber.

The Healthiest Foods You Can Get Vegetables

The Healthiest Foods You Can GetOnions
An onion can help to protect against cancer. A cup of onions offers 61 calories, 0 fat, and 3 grams of fiber.

Broccoli
Broccoli can help protect against breast cancer, and it also contains a lot of vitamin C and beta- carotene. One cup of chopped broccoli contains 25 calories, 0 fat, and 3 grams of fiber.

Spinach
Spinach contains carotenoids that can help fend off macular degeneration, which is a major cause of blindness in older people. One cup contains 7 calories, 0 fat, and 1 gram of fiber.

Grains, beans, and nuts

The Healthiest Foods You Can Get Peanuts
Peanuts and other nuts can lower your risk of heart disease by 20 percent. One ounce contains 166 calories, 14 grams of fat, and over 2 grams of fiber.

The Healthiest Foods You Can Get Pinto beans
A half cut of pinto beans offers more than 25 percent of your daily folate requirement, which protects you against heart disease. Half a cup contains 103 calories, 1 gram of fat, and 6 grams of fiber.

The Healthiest Foods You Can Get Skim milk
Skim milk offers vitamin B2, which is important for good vision and along with Vitamin A could improve allergies. You also get calcium and vitamin D as well. One cup contains 86 calories, o fat, and 0 fiber.

The Healthiest Foods You Can Get Seafood

The Healthiest Foods You Can Get Salmon
All cold water fish such as salmon, mackerel, and tuna are excellent sources of omega 3 fatty acids, which help to reduce the risk of cardiac disease. A 3 ounce portion of salmon contains 127 calories, 4 grams of fat, and 0 fiber.

The Healthiest Foods You Can Get Crab
Crab is a great source of vitamin B12 and immunity boosting zinc. A 3 ounce serving of crab offers 84 calories, 1 gram of fat, and 0 fiber.

 

Healthy Food Choices

Eating healthy is something we all would like to do,  although it can be hard. In order to eat healthy, you must first make the right food choices. Eating healthy is all about what you eat, which makes the choices very crucial to your results.

Grains

You should consume 6 ounces of grains per day. To do this, you can eat 3 ounces of whole grain cereals, breads, rice,
crackers, or pasta. You can get an ounce of grains in  a single slice of bread, or 1 cut of cereal.

Vegetables
These should be varied, as you should eat 2 1/2 cups of them each day. You should start eating more of the dark
vegetables, such as broccili and spinach. Carrots and sweet potatoes are good as well. You should also eat more dry beans such as peas, pinto beans, and even kidney beans.

Fruits

Fruits are very important. You should try to eat 2 cups of them each day. Focus on eating a variety, such as  fresh, frozen, canned, or even dried fruit. You can  drink fruit juices as well, although you should use  moderation when doing so.

Milk

Milk is your calcium rich friend. For adults, 3 cups is the ideal goal. For kids 2 – 8, 2 cups is where you want to be. When choosing milk products or yogurt, you should go for fat-free or low-fat. Those of you who don’t like milk or can’t have it, should go for lactose free products or other sources of calcium such as fortified foods and beverages.

Meat and beans

Eating 5 ounces a day is the ideal goal, as you should go lean with your protein. When eating meat, always bake it,
grill it, or broil it, as this will prevent grease from  adding to the equation. You should vary your protein  as well, with more fish, beans, peas, and nuts.

When cooking your food, you should also limit solid fats such as butter, margarine, shortening, and lard. These foods may add flavor to your dishes, although they can also help raise your cholesterol as well. Therefore, you should try to add these foods and any foods that happen to contain them.

To help keep your saturated fat, trans fat, and sodium low, you can check the nutrition facts label. This label can be found on the food package and will tell you all the information you need to know about the food item.

By picking your foods wisely and watching what you eat, you’ll help control your lifestyle. Exercise is great as well, as it goes along perfect with a healthy eating lifestyle. No matter what your age may be, eating healthy will help you keep your active lifestyle for years and years – even help you and your health in the long run as well.

 

Vegetables: The Healthier Snack

The easiest place to affect our health is through our eating habits; in fact it’s the most effective solution to better health, sharing the spotlight with exercise.  What about our food intake?  What choices do we have to make eating a healthier occurrence?

Vegetables are a great place to start.  There are so many choices in the filed of vegetables, being picky isn’t even a problem here. It does not matter where your location, the time of the year, or the method of preparation, there are vegetables to suit the most discriminating taste

As a teen, most of us don’t even care if we’re eating right, or begin to understand the implications of poor eating habits.  As we age, however, we do begin to notice the effects of improper exercise, poor eating habits, and how they affect our health.  Today, as the baby boomers begin their retirement years, health concerns and questions are on the rise.  These aging boomers are more concerned than any previous generations about their good health, their ability to keep their good health, and how their diet affects their health.

The choices in vegetables run the gamut in color preference, leafy versus bean, fresh and raw, or freshly picked and cooked.  There are vegetables high in beta-carotene, high in flavonoids, anti-oxidants, or just plain high in flavor.

What about as a snack?  Do vegetables meet the snack requirement for taste?  We already know that vegetables are good for us, but if we’re going to snack, we want something that tastes really good.

There are vegetables that fill that bill, quite successfully.  What about celery?  Celery with pimento or peanut butter is quite delicious.  Or, you have the broccoli and cauliflower combination with ranch dip.  That’s a snack that any other snack would be hard pressed to surpass.

Then you have the dill pickle.  This is such a successful snack that manufacturer’s put it in little plastic bags with juice and sell it.  The dill pickle can be found in convenience stores everywhere.   Past the pickle, you have carrots, sweet potatoes, and onions.  These wonderful vegetables can be fixed in so many different ways to snack on, that it would take several papers to touch on all the possibilities.

One of a southerner’s favorite snacks would be baked sweet potato.  Now, this is normally consumed with large amounts of butter, but doesn’t have to be, in order to be good.  The baked sweet potato can simply be peeled and eaten straight from the oven and it’s still delicious.

Onions can be fried whole as blooming onions, or cut into rings, battered, and served with dip as a snack or appetizer.  Many restaurants carry them as a staple on their menus.  Jalapeno peppers are often stuffed with cheese and served in this way.

Then you have the little carrot.  This wonderful little finger food is full of beta-carotene, flavonoids, and anti-oxidants that make it one of the most healthful snacks we can consume.

You should have enough options now for snacking, that healthful snacking can become a standard, not an exception for you.  These ideas do not by any means encompass all vegetable options; these are just simply the most popular local favorites if you live in the South and in Alabama.

What Do We Really Need to Eat?

Today’s food diet consists mostly of meat and starch.  The fast food drive thru at your local burger joint doesn’t offer a menu of fresh fruit and vegetables.  We’ve become a nation of massive carbohydrate consumers.  But that wasn’t the original plan.

During the days of hunting and gathering, the daily diet consisted mostly of fruits, vegetables and other plant life.  Meat was a scarcity, and bread was virtually non-existent.  During this period in time, there was no problem with obesity.  Of course, hygiene was a problem.  It seems now we’ve solved many of our personal hygiene need problems, and forgotten that in order to survive and enjoy the fruits of our labor, we must pay attention to our eating habits. Our health is the most important asset we have.

Our physical makeup, metabolism, and nutritional need dictate a far different diet than we have come to enjoy.  Cakes, cookies, colas, and kool-aid are not on the healthy diet plan.  Vegetables, fruits, nuts, and plenty of water are the key ingredients to a healthy person.  Even the food pyramid put together by the USDA doesn’t accurately reflect our daily need for optimal health.

Meat is necessary for protein consumption, but it can be obtained from other plant sources.  Peanuts and other nuts contain high quantities of protein.  Eggs and cheese also contain protein.  If meat is to be consumed, fish would be a better choice.  It is high in the omega acids and actually contributes to our health.

Red meat, pork, and chicken were never intended to be our daily staples.  They were luxuries, to be consumed in small doses, only a few times a week.  Today, we will have meat before we have vegetables.

And, then you can take a look at the vegetables we do consume. The starchier the vegetable, the more ways we can invent to prepare it.  Look at the potato, we’ve found more uses for this food, than any other on the planet. It also has the highest level of starch, and can send our blood sugar levels soaring.

Even our medical profession is still researching what our bodies should consume.  Everyone thought they had it figured out when the food pyramid was put together. But now some fifty years later, we have a nation facing an obesity epidemic, and although we are living longer, our hearts are not as healthy as they should be given all the healthy foods we have to choose from, and the exercise facilities available.  Maybe we still have long way to go in coming full circle with what our ancestors had no choice in doing: a diet of mostly vegetables.  The vegetarians may be way ahead of the rest of society.

The other side of this coin has to do with our calorie intake. Consuming fewer calories keeps us leaner and healthier.  All of our body processes function better, when we cut our calorie intake to a level this is about 2/3 of the daily recommended intake of 2000 calories. So how did we arrive at 2000 calories per day? This figure was taken based on the average consumption of a physically active, middle-aged male.  Does anyone female see a problem here?

What we really need to consume for optimal health is a personal formula.  Each and every person is different, calorie and exercise needs are unique to every person.  When our medical profession, our health experts, and any other concerned organization come to realize this fact, and formulate a way for individualized programs to become commonplace then we, as individuals, will be eating what we need to eat.

Vegetables: The Best and The Worst

As a teen, most of us don’t even care if we’re eating right, or begin to understand the implications of poor eating habits.  As we age, however, we do begin to notice the effects of improper exercise, poor eating habits, and how they affect our health.  Today, as the baby boomers begin their retirement years, health concerns and questions are on the rise.  These aging boomers are more concerned than any previous generations about their good health, their ability to keep their good health, and how their diet affects their health.

The easiest place to affect our health is through our eating habits; in fact it’s the most effective solution to better health, sharing the spotlight with exercise.  What about our food intake?  What choices do we have to make eating a healthier occurrence?

Vegetables are a great place to start.  There are so many choices in the filed of vegetables, being picky isn’t even a problem here. It does not matter where your location, the time of the year, or the method of preparation, there are vegetables to suit the most discriminating taste.

The choices in vegetables run the gamut in color preference, leafy versus bean, fresh and raw, or freshly picked and cooked.  There are vegetables high in beta-carotene, high in flavonoids, anti-oxidants, or just plain high in flavor.

Do you prefer consuming your vegetables in a salad? On a sandwich? Or in a simmer pot?  Maybe you would prefer a fresh salsa to eat with your main course?  As I stated earlier, it matter not about your individual taste, there is a vegetable to suit.

Exotic vegetables from Asian countries, tried and true vegetables from the backyard, or the latest from the Farmer’s market, the choices can seem at times overwhelming.  We should never run out of new recipes to try, new dishes to put before our families and friends, or just simply to fix and eat for our own enjoyment.

Summertime brings a rich bounty of vegetable choices, so many in fact, that most people preserve some in canning, freezing, and pickling.  As a child growing up in the south, summertime meant fresh vegetables straight from the garden.  Fresh peas, corn, and tomatoes on the dinner table with cornbread is a feast fit for a king!  I will have to admit here, that cornbread would not be the healthiest choice in bread, but it’s unbeatable in the taste department.

What about wintertime?  Thanks to greenhouse growers, and improved methods for winter crops, we now have many choices for vegetable consumption even during the winter months.  Soups and stews that abound during the colder weather are filled with wonderful vegetables to add just the right flavor and texture to a snowy, cold afternoon.

So, you see, healthy doesn’t equate to a lack of taste, or zestful appeal.  Healthy just means that while we’re enjoying the wonderful Cobb salad, we can also delight in the fact that we did a double whammy, good and good for you!